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Strengthening Our Community Initiative (SOCI) Harvey Randall Wickes Foundation

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Written by Marisa Eynon-Ezop Wednesday, 09 July 2014 13:46

The Saginaw County Youth Protection Council

Prevention and Youth Services Division

awarded a SOCI grant from the Harvey Randall Wickes Foundation

Summer 2014

 

Program Description:

PAYS/DEC proposes to address the issue of Bullying Prevention by providing City of Saginaw elementary and middle school youth with Bullying Prevention Social –Emotional Learning Second Step programming & Too Good for Violence Social Perspectives (TGFV-SP) programming.

The Second Step program focuses on core social-emotional skills that are particularly important for bullying prevention; including empathy, emotion management, social problem solving, friendship building & assertiveness training. The middle school program teaches empathy/communication, emotion-management, coping skills, & decision making. These skills help students stay engaged in school, make good choices, set goals/avoid peer pressure, substance abuse, bullying/cyber bullying. The TGFV-SP program focuses on enhancing prosocial behaviors/skills & improving protective factors related to conflict and violence. Youth learn how to set goals, make good decisions, manage emotions, effectively communicate and how to apply these skills to conflict resolution, anger management and bullying.

The TGFV-SP program will be utilized for PAYS/DEC In-House groups where additional supportive services are needed for youth who have been referred from partner agencies.

Program Plan:

1) Core partner staff are trained by the Westlund Guidance Clinic therapists in administering the trauma screening tool.

2) Core partner staff receive trauma training.

3) Bullying Prevention programming is imbedded into partner site  program schedules.

4) Bullying Prevention programming begins at core partner sites August 2014.

5) Core partner staff utilize trauma screening tool with youth program participants to determine the need for additional supportive services including PAYS/DEC In-House groups & Westlund Guidance Clinic counseling services.

6) Youth are identified by core partner staff for additional supportive services with PAYS/DEC & Westlund Guidance Clinic.

7) PAYS In-House groups are scheduled.

8) Westlund Guidance Clinic therapists begin providing counseling services on site for youth who have been identified/parental consent received.

9) PAYS In-House programs begin & Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI)screenings are conducted by PAYS staff.

10) The first family fun night is scheduled Fall 2014

11) Trauma screening tool/SASSI screening tool analysis, program pre/post test analysis & site/participant evaluations are reviewed & shared with core partners.

In addition, on-going communication & service coordination/monthly meetings are conducted & program reports shared with core partner leadership to assure program quality/compliance. Boys and Girls Club Great Lakes Bay Region staff are invited to attend Westlund Guidance Clinic trauma trainings and provide referrals for In-House programs/Westlund Guidance Clinic counseling services.

Collaborative Efforts:

Program Partners/Service Locations: Youth Participate in Bullying Prevention Programming at PAYS/DEC, First Ward Community Services, The Salvation Army, Daniel’s Den Ministries and YMCA of Saginaw. Boys and Girls Club of the Great Lakes Bay Region provides referrals to PAYS/DEC in-house groups & Westlund Guidance Clinic services. Westlund Guidance Clinic therapists provide staff training and staff consultation to build the capacity of the service sites to effectively work with youth exposed to trauma. The Westlund Guidance Clinic therapists also provide individual and family counseling for those youth needing additional services.

Geographic Area/Population to be served:

Youth ages 8 – 14 primarily in grades 3rd – 8th /families of youth involved in Summer/After School programs in the City of Saginaw through: PAYS/DEC, First Ward Community Services, The Salvation Army, Daniel’s Den Ministries, YMCA of Saginaw, and the Westlund Guidance Clinic.

Project Evaluation/Anticipated Outcomes:

Evaluation includes: Second Step & TGFV-SP program pre/post tests, site contact evaluation, youth program evaluation, Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) Screening tool, Westlund Guidance Clinic trauma screening tool analysis, referral tracking to Westlund Guidance Clinic Counseling/PAYS In-House programs.

Outcomes:

1) Increase in social competence & pro social behavior.

2) Reduced incidence of negative, aggressive, or antisocial behaviors.

3) Participants will demonstrate higher average rates of pro social behavior ("engages appropriately with peers," "follows directions from adults").

4) Participants will demonstrate higher rates of pro social behavior in classrooms, on playgrounds, and in cafeterias.

5) Teachers/site contacts will report fewer antisocial behaviors among participants.

6) Participants will show significant gains in knowledge about empathy, anger management, impulse control, and bully-proofing.

7) Participants will show greater improvement in teacher/site contact ratings of their social competence.

8) Participants will require less adult intervention in minor conflicts.

9) Participants will become less aggressive.

10) Participants will become more likely to choose positive social skills.

 

 

Bullying Awareness

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 19 March 2014 14:00 Written by Marisa Eynon-Ezop Wednesday, 19 March 2014 13:54

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Second Step Social Emotional Learning Program

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Written by Marisa Eynon-Ezop Wednesday, 19 March 2014 08:45

PAYS new Social Emotional Learning Program for youth in Elementary and Middle School!

No single factor puts a child at risk of being bullied or bullying others. Bullying can happen anywhere—cities, suburbs, or rural towns. PAYS/DEC plans to address this issue by providing Saginaw County elementary/middle school students with Bullying Prevention Social –Emotional Learning Second Step programming.

According to Saginaw County October 2013 count day preliminary figures, there are 24,235 students who are eligible for PAYS/DEC programs. The bullying prevention programs would be open to all Saginaw County elementary schools, middle schools, after school programs, Summer school programs and day care centers.

The elementary program focuses on core social-emotional skills that are particularly important for bullying prevention; including empathy, emotion management, social problem solving, friendship building and assertiveness training. The middle school program teaches empathy and communication, emotion-management, coping skills, and decision making. These skills help students stay engaged in school, make good choices, set goals, and avoid peer pressure, substance abuse, bullying, and cyber bullying.

Students will participate in a comprehensive bullying prevention program that will empower them and guide them toward making healthy choices. Many PAYS/DEC services occur during the school day. This structure allows the teachers’ precious time to focus on critical curriculum needs for their students, and aids in supporting mandatory health curriculum requirements.

PAYS/DEC programming addresses critical health issues like bullying and substance abuse with students. Unfortunately, as you know, many families do not address these critical health issues at home with their children. Teachers just don’t have the time to effectively integrate many critical health issues like bullying into their mandatory lesson requirements. PAYS/DEC is able to provide these critical health services to the community. Sources: Stop Bullying.gov and Committee for Children.

   

New Senate Bill

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 13 March 2013 15:09 Written by Marisa Eynon-Ezop Wednesday, 13 March 2013 15:01

The following information was distributed by the Saginaw County Department of Public Health Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention Services Division.

Public Act 543 of 2012 takes effect at the end of the month, March 31, 2013.  This law will make it a crime to operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of or while visibly impaired by the ingestion of an “intoxicating substance”.  Because the definition of “intoxicating substance” will include prescription drugs, a concern has been expressed that this will result in prosecution of drivers who lawfully take prescription medication.   That will not happen under a proper understanding of the law.

Please note this is not a per se law.  A person does not violate this law just because they have ingested an intoxicating substance, any more than a person violates this just because they had one or two drinks.  A person violates this law only when they operate a motor vehicle when they are under the influence or visibly impaired by the intoxicating substance

 What does this mean?

 "Under the influence” means that because of consuming an “intoxicating substance”, the defendant's ability to operate a motor vehicle in a normal manner was substantially lessened.   The test is whether, because of consuming an “intoxicating substance”, the defendant's mental or physical condition was significantly affected and the defendant was no longer able to operate a vehicle in a normal manner.

To prove that the defendant operated “while visibly impaired,” the prosecutor must also prove beyond a reasonable doubt that, due to the consumption of an “intoxicating substance”, the defendant drove with less ability than would an ordinary careful driver. The defendant's driving ability must have been lessened to the point that it would have been noticed by another person.

In essence, if an individual is properly taking his/her own prescribed medication, they can properly drive their vehicle without facing any charges under the new law.  But they will risk arrest and prosecution if:

  •  They ignore the prescription warnings that it may not be safe to operate a vehicle after taking their medication and the medication actually affects their ability to drive, or,
  •  They don’t follow the prescription instructions such as they take more than the recommended dosage, or combine it with alcohol or other drugs, and it affects their ability drive, or,
  •  They take someone else’s prescribed medication and it affects their ability to drive.

People who drive when their ability has been affected by prescription drugs are just as dangerous as someone who has consumed too much alcohol, or a schedule 1 controlled substance, and should no longer have a loophole that allows them to endanger the public without facing criminal consequences.

 

 

 

Did You Know?

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"$1 Spent on Prevention saves $10? Investing in addiction prevention programs yields a 10-1 return for society."

Source: Join Together March 16, 2009